Thursday, December 27, 2007

Earth at Twilight


Credit: ISS Crew, Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Lab, JSC, NASA
Explanation: No sudden, sharp boundary marks the passage of day into night in this gorgeous view of ocean and clouds over our fair planet Earth. Instead, the shadow line or terminator is diffuse and shows the gradual transition to darkness we experience as twilight. With the Sun illuminating the scene from the right, the cloud tops reflect gently reddened sunlight filtered through the dusty troposphere, the lowest layer of the planet's nurturing atmosphere. A clear high altitude layer, visible along the dayside's upper edge, scatters blue sunlight and fades into the blackness of space. This picture actually is a single digital photograph taken in June of 2001 from the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of 211 nautical miles.

6 comments:

The Merry Widow said...

Isn't that cool? The soft fade to night and then a soft fade to morning!
How is everything going? Life settling down finally? How did mediation go? Did the nitwit gain some brains? Is he going to be a problem in the future?
Good morning, G*D bless and Maranatha!

tmw

Brooke said...

Snagged and on the desktop!

Eyes said...

top of the morning tmw! Yes, we settled earlier this month and I'm very happy it's over!

Farmer John said...

It's so.... pink.

The Merry Widow said...

The atmosphere is at least blue...want I should tie a blue satin ribbon around it?
Blessed New Year!

tmw

Eyes said...

Pink and blue... bi...